Welcome to St Patrick's Roman Catholic Church

St  Patrick's  Roman  Catholic  Church  in   Grangetown,   Cardiff,   is   part   of   the   Cardiff    Deanery   of   the Roman   Catholic   Archdiocese   of   Cardiff.  

It   opened   on   St Patrick's Day  March  17th  1930.

 

 

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St Patricks RC Primary School is  in Lucknow Street, Grangetown

 It has close links with the Church.

A school mass is celebrated   in school during term times.

The school  website.  http://www.stpatricks-primary.co.uk/

No Masses , Baptisms  or  Weddings  until further notice. 

For Funerals,  please contact your Funeral Director.

Anyone who needs help 

please phone

02920 253514

                  Thought of the week:

YOU CAN GO TO HEAVEN

without health, without wealth, without fame, without a great name,  without learning, without earning, without culture, without beauty, without friends, and without  ten thousand other things.  But you can NEVER go to heaven without     JESUS

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15th Sunday  in Ordinary Time

July is the month of the
Most Precious Blood
Please click on the image above for today's readings
Sunday 12th July

We are open for private prayer on Monday,  Wednesday and Friday 11.00am -12.00 Midday

Coronavirus  precautions

are in place

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This Sunday each and every one of us heard from the Sacred Scriptures a very interesting set of readings which reminded us of what we can and what we should be doing as Christians in our daily lives, in our actions and in how we interact with each other. These readings remind us of our true Christian calling and mission, in our mission to be the bearers of God’s Good News in this world, and spread His truth and light amidst this darkened world.

In our Gospel today, we then hear of the famous and well-known parable of the sower, with which all of us must be very familiar. In that parable, the Lord used the example of a sower spreading seeds that ended up landing on different surfaces and on different types of soils and conditions. The Lord used this parable as many among the people were farmers or were involved in various agricultural works and practices, especially many of those who followed Him, and by doing so, in fact, He was spreading the ‘seeds of God’s word and truth’ among them by making the truth more easily understood by them, by speaking in terms that they could understand better.

What is the significance of this story? Each and every one of us have received these seeds, the seeds of faith from God, the seeds of hope, the seeds of love, of wisdom and good judgement, of righteousness, justice and holiness, and of many other virtues. And having heard of how those seeds that fell by the wayside, on the rocky ground and among the thistles and branches have ended up, failing to grow, being snatched away or being destroyed without any results, we must realise that as Christians, each and every one of us has to contemplate the gift of the word of God, the seeds of faith that God has given us.

And so we are all challenged today, to be those seeds that grow into healthy and fruitful plants, those that bear fruits thirty-fold, sixty-fold, and a hundredfold if not more. This means that we all have tremendous potential in us to effect a great change in our community, and many among the people can be touched by our lives, our actions and our efforts.

May the Lord, the Sower of our faith, continue to guide us all and strengthen us, that we may indeed be blessed and bountiful in everything we do, that hopefully, by whatever we say and do, we may bring many others to righteousness and towards God’s salvation, and be good witnesses of His truth, be bearers of His hope and light into our darkened world, to bring His Good News to many who have not yet heard or believed in Him, that many more souls may be saved.

Ordinary Time
The Season after Pentecost lasts from the Monday after Pentecost Sunday until the Saturday before the First Sunday of Advent. This Season after Pentecost is also known as “Ordinary Time.” The word “ordinary” means “numbered” because the Sundays of Ordinary Time are numbered. The normal liturgical colour for Ordinary Time—for those days when there is no special feast—is green. Green vestments  have traditionally been associated with the time after Pentecost, the period in which the Church founded by the risen Christ and enlivened by the Holy Spirit began to grow and to spread the Gospel to all nations.

Mass can be followed on these links.

http://www.catholictv.org/masses/catholictv-mass                   Daily Mass  (On Demand)

https://www.mcnmedia.tv/camera/st-mary-of-the-angels    10.00am Sunday and Daily  Mass

 

               https://dailytvmass.com/     --Daily Mass

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Read the message from Canon Mike on our    newsletter

July 12th 2020

O Lord, may we find the joy of the Lord even in the midst of our trials. We pray that You would teach us what it means to see beyond our troubles, knowing that You are with us.  Even so, Lord God, we see the challenges those around us are facing. We ask You to intervene, to be with those who are in need, to prompt us to participate with You as You care for your people, and, most of all, to restore creation and to make all things new. We pray that we would not be anxious, but that You would give us Your peace. Let us live differently in the midst of trial so that the world might see You in us.

Amen

The Feast of St Benedict is on July 11th.

St Benedict was born in Norcia in Umbria about 480. He studied in Rome, and then turned his back on the world and lived in solitude.  Disciples came to him and he went to Monte Cassino, where he founded a monastery. He wrote his Rule, which established the spirituality and way of life of monastic communities ever since. He died in 547.

 Coronavirus  

For latest information     Click here

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For help in the Grangetown area   click here

Blessed are they who stayed indoors for they protected others.

Blessed are the unemployed for they recognised their dependence on God.

Blessed are the postal workers and the delivery drivers  who bring us our essential needs.

Blessed are the front-line workers who stand between us and the grave, may they see the face of God.

Blessed are the rubbish collectors, who when faced with mountains of rubbish still could discern the hand of God.

Blessed are the single parents who keep on being responsible 24/7 . God does not forget them.

Blessed are those who are alone, may they never forget they are God's  children.

Rohan Tulloch ( Jesuit)

 
Let us ask Our Lady of Lourdes to intercede for us.

Latest  News  and  Information

               

This includes:          Newsletters,        

       

             Latest news  from  Pope  Francis      St Patrick's  Primary  School  Website       Holy Days of Obligation

                                                                                        What does IHS mean?          

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